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The False Friend Realization

Legend has it that, once upon a time, a Spaniard landed in Germany with an unsettled stomach and walked into a café to get a comforting tea. And then false friends happened.Expat Gone Foreign, tXc, false friends, Spanish, German, infusion, blunders

From Latin īnfundō (to pour in, upon or into), an infusion originally referred to the liquid which had had ingredients steeped in it to extract useful qualities, hence nowadays we still use the word infusion for beverages such as tea. Later on the term slid into medicine to refer to the administration of liquid substances directly into a vein, i.e. transfusion. False friends may not as distant as they might seem. One just has to find the etymological link between them. : )

The Origins – Funny Spanish

Lately I’ve taken a few trips down memory lane trying to figure out where my passion for languages originated. How did it all start? Born in Andalusia, my first interactions with non-Spaniards took place whenever my family would go camping along the Portuguese coast during the summer holidays.
Expat Gone Foreign, tXc, Portuguese, foreign languages, learning, exploring

[Translation]
Boy: What’s your name?
Me: Mom, he speaks funny Spanish.

The Last Name Standing

Two issues at hand. First, coming from a Spanish-speaking country I have always thought the notion of dropping your name upon marriage is barbaric. Second, here’s the problem I have with incongruous feminists in this country:

Expat Gone Foreign, tXc, last names, surnames, marriage, maiden name

In Spanish-speaking countries, women keep their last names (yes, we have two) from the cradle to the grave. However, many countries are still under the spell of the 9th-century English Doctrine of Coverture. According to this law, women lacked an independent legal identity, they received their father’s last name at birth and automatically took their husband’s upon marriage.

I get it, societies were quite different back then, and women were mere property passed on from fathers to husbands like a football. But what about now? One would think that the world would have moved into a new direction by now, but here we are, in the 21st century, and the norm of married women taking their husband’s name remains ubiquitous.

We continue fighting for rights and claiming women’s visibility in society, without realizing that this is one of the many profoundly patriarchal and heterosexist traditions being perpetuated out of inertia, even by highly successful, educated, independent women. Ladies, it’s time to embrace our own identity and never it let go – unless your name is horrific 1, in which case, f*ck that shit.