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Mediterranean Hospitality

Warmth, friendliness and exquisite cuisine. If this is what comes to mind whenever you think of Mediterranean countries, you are not wrong. Southern folks certainly have their amicable ways going for them, and they also pride themselves on their local produce and delicious homemade meals. Whether you are visiting your relatives or meeting some friends in the warm South, you’ll realize soon enough that Mediterranean hospitality is no joke.Expat Gone Foreign, tXc, culture comics, Mediterranean, hospitality, living abroad comics

I have always wondered what would happen if you were to respond: “Yes, please!”. Would they then shovel a double portion onto your plate? Would they be pleased or taken aback by such a gluttonous response?

In addition, if you happen to be in a small city where everyone knows everyone, neighbors and acquaintances will promptly invite you in for a chat if they see you wandering around. Offering a bite to your visitors is not a choice, it’s a a well-rooted lifestyle. And by bite I mean an enticing feast with enough food to sink Noah’s Ark.

But hey, Mediterraneans certainly enjoy providing their guests with delicious meals as much as I enjoy devouring them. So, who am I to turn down their hearty generosity?

*Burps*

 

If you liked this strip, check out Home Sweet Yummy Home.

Are you a foodie who holds Mediterranean cuisine in high esteem? Read the article Exotic Kackendorf Food and other Culinary Violations.

The Weißwurstäquator

A new fun word I learnt this week! The Weißwurstäquator refers to the supposed cultural divide separating Southern Germany from the rest of the country. I believe it’s named after the white sausage, which is traditional in Bavaria, along with its lovely castles, medieval towns and tasty food. Road trip time, gell?

Expat Gone Foreign, tXc, Weißwurstäquator, Bavaria

The Culinary Combination Aberration

Germany is certainly second to none when it comes to creative mixtures of flavors in drinks, yogurts and other assorted beverages. The same folks that brought you Spezi (Coke and Fanta), the Erdbeerbier (strawberry beer) and orange chili chocolate, went the extra mile to enhance their flavor palette with their transculinary dairy products.

This week I spotted tzatziki pistachio ice cream in the neighborhood. But don’t panic just yet. If the ice cream fusion blowout is too much for your taste buds to handle, you can always wash it down one of Germany’s favorite sodas: the curry wurst coke. In the meantime, I’ll continue my quest for coconut yogurt – my favorite -, yet devoid of bananas, pineapple, artichokes or Kartoffelsalat.

Expat Gone Foreign, tXc, German food, gastronomy, ice cream