Menu Close

Multilingual Christmas Wishes

Christmas is coming and I’ve spent the weekend designing this year’s Christmas cards for my family. Before delving into the creative process,  I asked myself “What is Christmas for me?”

1. Family
2. Delicious food
3. More yummy food
4. Sunny weather
5. Did I mention the food?

And here is the result!

Expat Gone Foreign, tXc, language comics, travel comics, fun cards

I also wanted to wish everyone a “merry Christmas” in their native language, because “If you talk to [a man] in his language, that goes to his heart”. But who has the time to customize every card? The solution is sending multilingual Christmas wishes! Not only do they promote language fun, but they also provide two minutes of coloring relaxation.

Expat Gone Foreign, tXc, language comics, travel comics, fun cards

And the best part is… these Christmas cards are now available in the Expat Gone Foreign’s Store, ta-dah! Here are the links:

Multilingual Merry Christmas (card)
Christmas is coming! (card)
Christmas is coming! (postcard)
¡Llega la navidad! (postcard)

Surprise your family and friends with multilingual wishes! :D

Do you have questions, suggestions or wishes? Send me an email at expatgoneforeign@gmail.com : )

Kids vs. Dogs

Once you get to a certain age 1, specially as a woman, people won’t stop nagging you about having kids 2. No, thanks! My affection is reserved to other mammals.

Expat Gone Foreign, tXc, childfree, love dogs, pets

German Time Measurements

As if the German language weren’t twisted enough with its random gendered articles and convoluted syntax, even simple time structures can mess up your whole schedule. Expat Gone Foreign, tXc, German time, die Uhrzeit auf Deutsch, Deutsche Sprache schwere SpracheIn the spoken language, 3:00, 3:05, 3:10 and so on are easy: drei Uhr (three hour), fünf nach drei (five after three), zehn nach drei (ten after three). But when the minute hand reaches “half past”, Germans take the next full hour as a reference. In German – unlike most languages – “halb drei” wouldn’t be “half past three” but “half past two”, in the sense of “we are half way to three”.

This incident made me realize two things. First, the reason why Germans think of foreigners as “tardy people whose idea of being on time is showing up an hour late”. If you don’t know how time works and get all your appointments at “half”, you are bound to perpetuate the stereotype of the lazy, unpunctual foreigner.

The other thing I realized is that Germans live in the future. Instead of taking the current hour as a reference, they jump on to the next, as if they were anxious to get past the present. For 3:25 they’ll say “fünf vor halb vier”, literally “five before half way to four”. With such a rush to beat time, no one can really enjoy the present. No wonder everyone is so stressed out.

Expat Gone Foreign, linguist, travel and language comics, life abroad